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GE Healthcare Set to Revolutionize the Imaging of Live Cells

November 1, 2011

Today, Applied Precision, a GE Healthcare company, announced the launch the world’s first system capable of acquiring moving images of live cells at super-resolution in all three dimensions.

This revolutionary new technology, the DeltaVision OMX Blaze™, promises to help accelerate research scientists’ understanding of a wide range of diseases at the molecular level and inform the design of new potential treatments.

This press kit includes the press release, video and images.

PRESS CONTACT: Val Jones (val.jones@ge.com): +44 791 717 5192


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“It’s a pretty extraordinary feeling, to see moving images of live cells at a greater level of detail than anyone has witnessed before. The implications of this advance in imaging technology are hugely exciting for researchers. With the OMX Blaze we can start to answer questions that we never could before.”
Paul Goodwin, Director of Advanced Applications, API

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“We are only at the beginning of what this technology can do. The ability to follow cellular interactions, over time at the molecular level will open up new frontiers in so many areas of life science research. This is a hugely important step forward for cellular imaging.”
Dr Amr Abid, General Manager of Cell Technologies, GE Healthcare Life Sciences

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“We’re at the point where we need to understand mechanisms of health and disease at the molecular level. The OMX Blaze has tremendous potential as a research tool, and we are very excited to apply this in our laboratory models to observe the response of cancer cells to chemotherapy, the cell-to-cell transmission of HIV and other viruses, and the dynamics of engineered nanoparticles.”
Dr Frank Chuang, Associate Research Director, CBST